Water: The Fundamental Element of Life

By purehealthandhappiness@gmail.com

Warning! What you are about to read is going to significantly improve your life. In fact, it is  some of the most critical information that will change how you feel, what you think about, and how you interact with the rest of the world. Although it might sound a little dull or monotonous, the topic of conversation for today is water. Yes, water. That clear, tasteless, and sometimes boring, wet stuff that we rely on for drinking, cooking, cleaning, and watering our plants. Are you still with me? I hope so because, in all honesty, water is the most critical element of life.

Why water?
According to Leonardo da Vinci, “Water is the driving force of all nature.” Now, most of us intuitively know, or have been told, that water is important. Yet, before doing my own in-depth study of the role that water plays in our bodies, I felt that water was, well . . . unexciting. I asked myself, “Why drink water when we can drink something more exciting, like coffee, tea, juice, soft drinks, or anything other than plain water?” In all honesty, I am the first to admit that there were points in my own life when I didn’t even think about drinking water, but that was before I began to see stories about people getting
extremely sick from their water supplies. My brain became curious, and I began to question the vital role that water seemed to be playing, not only in our bodies, but also in the world.

Without delving too deep into the science of water, I want to share some highlights about why water should be your new best friend. Earth is made up of roughly 71% water. Its’ oceans hold 96.5% of all the planet’s water. Less than 1% of the water (non-saline) on Earth is available for human consumption. Depending on what source you are reading, it is reported that our bodies are between 65%-80% water.

The bottom line is this . . . we NEED water.

What does water do for our bodies?
Both our brain and blood are 90% water, and our muscles are 75% water. Therefore, water is necessary for every function in the body. Without proper hydration, we simply can’t function to the best of our abilities. Whether it’s thinking, digesting, eliminating toxins, using energy, or replenishing cells, we’re cutting ourselves short every single day, while demanding more in terms of functionality. To put it simply, we’re using old, polluted fuel in our sports cars and expecting peak performance on the racetrack of life.

So, how is it that the majority of humans are either dehydrated, or slightly dehydrated, on a daily basis? It may come down to confusion or misinformation. Originally, I was taught that if I wanted to find my ultimate hydration level, I would take my body weight and multiply it by .67. This would give me the proper number of ounces to drink per day. As an example, a person weighing 180lbs. x .67 = 120.6 ounces or 10 12-ounce glasses of water per day. After further research, I read that drinking half my body weight is more optimal for overall hydration and better body function. Personally, I strive for the higher
number because it’s a challenge for me to drink that much water. Even if I fall short, I’m still making gains, so it’s still a great personal goal! I want to challenge you to do the same. It won’t take long for you to see the difference in your energy levels, brain and body function, as well as mood.

Let’s talk about the quality of water.
Did you know there is a difference between living and dead water? I didn’t until I watched an amazing documentary, currently available on Amazon Prime, called the “Secret of Water” (Disclaimer: If you are not an avid documentary fan, you may think the beginning is a bit dry, but hang on because it gets better). I learned that when water is in its most raw, virgin form, it is active or “alive.” It is only when water is forced to travel in unnatural directions, through man-made pipes, that its structure is broken down, while it also collects negative information from pollution and people along the way. The result of
this is dead water. Therefore, the water being cycled through our current closed loop systems is already dead before we are even exposed to it. So, what about water filtration? You may have noticed that there are different choices when it comes to water: spring, pure, distilled, etc. Your best option is definitely going to be spring water. This is going to be the type with the most natural elements still intact, which means your body will get the most benefits.

Do you have any tips for increasing water intake?
Now that you know more about the importance of water, you might be wondering about some ways you can drink more water. In order to intrigue my own taste buds, I add some natural flavor to my water. I get creative with what I am adding to my water pitcher each morning – lemons, limes, oranges, cucumbers, strawberries, mint, rosemary, etc. To make it readily available, I have a large, special glass that I carry with me, so I can keep it filled at all times! I also set up automatic reminders on my phone to alert me that it’s time to drink my water. At the end of the day, I calculate how many total ounces I drank. This keeps me on track and helps me push myself to drink more the next day, if I haven’t met my goal. Note: If I drink coffee or tea, which are dehydrating, I drink an equal amount of water to balance it out.

Making water a priority is definitely a discipline, but when my body is fully hydrated (this happens after three days of maximum water consumption), I feel so much better! My brain gets into the “zone,” my body feels free from toxins and excess waste, and my muscles aren’t as sore and tight after I’ve done my daily three-mile walk. In addition, I just feel great, and it’s all because I’m drinking water. In the future, I will be doing a water challenge. Will you join me? Follow the link below and say, “I want to be my best
with water!” I will be making some cool resources available, and someone will win a swanky, new water bottle! So, raise a glass to water and see how amazing you can feel!

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